Timeshare lies and Wesley Financial Group Lawsuits need to be stopped

Our President & CEO, Chuck McDowell, has faced a lot on his way to being a driving force in the timeshare cancellation industry. Lawsuits didn’t deter him from doing what was right, which was taking a stand against timeshare fraudsters. At Wesley Financial Group, lawsuits won’t deter us either. Wouldn’t it be great to stop timeshare liars in their tracks? Turns out a lot of people are tired of liars. An article on LiveScience.com examines the studies that have been used to try and figure out how liars work. Studies show it is very hard to tell when someone is lying. This article sheds a little light on lies, and we can see how it applies to timeshare fraudsters as well.

How to Figure Out Liars

Sci-Tech Editor Denise Chow begins, “Lying may be a common human behavior, but despite the ubiquitous nature of deception, humans are surprisingly inconsistent when it comes to separating fact from fiction. Turns out, those telltale ‘Pinocchio’s nose’ signals thought to expose a liar are either too subtle to be revealing or nonexistent, say psychologists. Even so, a growing body of research is revealing ways to turn humans into more accurate lie detectors, psychologists say. If such accurate lie-detection methods can be developed, they could provide useful applications in a variety of settings, ranging from criminal justice to intelligence gathering to financial or business situations, said Maria Hartwig, a professor of psychology at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City.” (Chow, 2013).

Timeshare liars create confusion

Those who have been duped in a timeshare have probably seen lying firsthand, but it was probably hard to distinguish it from the truth. Chow writes, “Lying may be a common human behavior, but despite the ubiquitous nature of deception, humans are surprisingly inconsistent when it comes to separating fact from fiction. Turns out, those telltale “Pinocchio’s nose” signals thought to expose a liar are either too subtle to be revealing or nonexistent, say psychologists.

Perfecting the Lie-Detector

Even so, a growing body of research is revealing ways to turn humans into more accurate lie detectors, psychologists say. If such accurate lie-detection methods can be developed, they could provide useful applications in a variety of settings, ranging from criminal justice to intelligence gathering to financial or business situations, said Maria Hartwig, a professor of psychology at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City.” (Chow, 2013). Perhaps lie-detection methods can be used to help stop timeshare fraud from happening in the first place

Chow writes, “In 2006, Charles Bond, then a professor at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, and Bella DePaulo, a visiting professor of social psychology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, found that untrained observers are correct only 54 percent of the time when trying to distinguish between true and false statements. These results indicate that people are no better or worse at detecting lies than if they had left their judgments up to chance. A 2008 study led by Aldert Vrij, a professor of applied social psychology at the University of Portsmouth in the United Kingdom, found similar results with regards to accuracy rates in distinguishing deception.” (Chow, 2013). If you are the victim of timeshare fraud, you probably didn’t see it coming. These studies exemplify how hard it is to determine whether or not someone is lying. If you or someone you know is the victim of timeshare fraud, you shouldn’t feel bad for falling in a fraudulent timeshare trap.

Tough to Figure out Liars

The article continues, “Yet, people tell lies — whether small or large — in roughly 25 percent of their social interactions, said Charles Honts, a professor of psychology at Boise State University in Idaho.…So why are humans not better at detecting lies? And how can people get better at spotting fibs?” One of the things going on here is generally people don’t know what to look for,” Honts said. Across societies, there are false beliefs that certain behavioral clues can indicate someone is lying, Honts explained. For instance, many people think liars shy away from making eye contact, blink a lot or fidget as they speak. “In reality, with those three things, it’s exactly the opposite,” Honts said. “People who are experienced at lying learn that the easiest way to make it seem like you’re telling a truth when you’re not is to look you in the eye.” (Chow, 2013).

If you’ve been duped in a timeshare, you can’t blame yourself for falling for timeshare fraud. Most of don’t know that we’re being lied to, and there’s nothing that we can really do about it except pick up the pieces. You don’t have to pick up the pieces alone if you’ve been taken advantage of by a timeshare company. Contact us at Wesley Financial Group. Lawsuits or otherwise will not deter us from doing what is right. We will stand up for you.

Lost money on a timeshare

Deceptive Behavior is Hard to Pinpoint

Chow’s article further examines what we may be able to hope for in the future of detecting lies.

“For DePaulo, who was an early pioneer of research on deception, part of the progress in her field has been to debunk enduring misconceptions about deceptive behavior. “We now know that the search for the perfect cue to deception is doomed,” DePaulo told LiveScience. “There is no Pinocchio’s nose. In fact, even the behaviors that do separate truths from lies to a statistically significant extent still are not all that strong or reliable.” Within the last decade, however, researchers have tried to approach the idea of human lie detection from a different angle.

Rather than simply observing someone’s behavior, which can introduce all kinds of biases, psychologists are looking at whether certain interview methods can prompt liars to respond in ways that reveal their deception, Hartwig said. “This represents a more promising approach because it makes the behavioral differences between liars and truth-tellers more noticeable,” Hartwig told LiveScience. “How do you question or interview a person to provoke responses or statements that can be signs of lying? Are there ways to ask people strategic questions to get liars and truth-tellers to respond in certain ways?”

Active Lie-Detection

If so, this tactic could eliminate some of the judgment biases that have plagued previous research on lie detection. “It’s sort of a paradigm shift,” Hartwig said. “The whole past of lie detection has been reconceptualized from paying close attention to a person’s behavior to a more active and interactive task.” (Chow, 2013).

The article takes a good look at lies and the hope that we may be able to detect them better in the future. For now, timeshare fraud is still happening. Until it stops, we will continue to fight against it at Wesley Financial Group. Lawsuit or otherwise didn’t stop our leader Chuck McDowell from doing what was right and sticking up for victims of timeshare fraud. Our team at Wesley Financial Group, lawsuit or else, stands up against deceit as well.

Wesley Financial Group: Lawsuit or Otherwise Won’t Stop Us From Fighting Timeshare Fraud

At Wesley Financial Group, lawsuit or otherwise won’t stop us from fighting against timeshare fraud for our clients. Although science is still trying to figure out a way to stop liars in their tracks, there is a long way to go until timeshare fraud stops. Until timeshare fraud ends, we will continue to fight for victims of timeshare fraud at Wesley Financial Group. Lawsuit or otherwise won’t deter us from doing what is right.

Chow, Denise. (May 31, 2013). Believe or Deceive? Why Liars Are Difficult to Sniff Out. www.livescience.com, https://www.livescience.com/37023-lying-deception-psychology.html